On the power of netbooks and laptops over Android/iOS

iOS and Android turn tablets into oversized phones, so no surprise they lose against phones – they have the same (or usually worse, at a given price point) capabilities while being larger, thus less convenient to carry and more fragile.

TeMPOraL on HN

Windows did try the same as Android and iOS with Windows RT, thankfully that was a disaster. Certainly that’s one of the bad points about iOS and Android they are so locked down that you have to jump through hoops if you wanted to use them as a work machine. You have almost no access to the file system and you have to pay iPad pro levels of money to get the novelty of having windows side-by-side.

Netbooks are ridiculously useful, I used to have a 15 minute bus ride to work with a 12″ Asus EEE and would manage to fill that 15 minutes with active development time every day. The work I did on that bus became the frontend for what now 10 years later is a $50m company. On the other end of the scale I spent weeks with my then 7 year-old nephew creating stop-motion animations using the same netbook.

For my current job I bought myself a $350 refurbished Thinkpad (T430, 8GB RAM, SSD, core i5), this brings me in all my income. You can compare that to people that pay $1000 for an iPhone X because they get bored of their iPhone 8.

The possible drawback is that a Thinkpad doesn’t have a touchscreen. But with my experiment of buying a laptop with a touch screen I found I pretty much never wanted to use the touch screen, it’s a slower interface than keyboard and mouse. You want the screen in front of you at arms length but then you have to reach with your arm to touch the screen.

I bought exactly the same spec Thinkpad for my 5 year old daughter. The Thinkpad T-series are great because you can pour a litre of liquid over them without problem [0] plus they’re built like a brick, so basically perfect for kids. My daughter immediately covered the grey brick with shiny stickers and gave it a name, ‘Fiona’. In theory Fiona has the full capability to do everything my daughter will ever need for the rest of her school years; I don’t imagine a massive shift away from laptops in schools for the next 15 years. Further to that Fiona’s got Ubuntu installed and I can then install Sugar [1] on top (the same software used for One Laptop Per Child [4]).

I can now teach her over the years what it means to have real freedom with your software and hardware.

P.S. I posted an original version of this on HN [3]

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